A Greek Tragedy – Ancient Authors Challenge

I was nominated by one of my top ten favourite bloggers Tales From The Mind of Kristian to take part in a challenge created by another top ten blogger A Guy Called Bloke for a very interesting challenge “Ancient Authors”

The rules are simple, as always:

•Choose the author or philosopher (it should be one from the Ancient Times). Don’t know anyone? Google it, It shouldn’t be so hard.

•Choose 3 quotes of this author/philosopher. The country of origin – doesn’t matter (Egypt, Greece…Italy). Add any info or explanation if you like.

•Share those quotes and nominate 3 to 6 people.

•The title for the post? Choose something cool.

I have to be honest, I almost picked Cher… but nothing worth quoting has ever come out of her mouth!

My ancient author was an easy choice. He’s been a favourite since Classical Studies, Aeschylus.

Aeschylus was an Ancient Greek playwright credited with pretty much revolutionising theatre in his day. He introduced more actors, costumes, interactions with the chorus and the use of trilogies amongst other things. He was quite an innovator.

Only seven of his plays survive, it’s estimated there were more than ten times that.

Apparently Robert F Kennedy pronounced him his favourite poet, quoting from Aeschylus when he had to deliver the news of Martin Luther Kings assassination at a campaign stop in Indianapolis.

Interestingly, Robert Kennedy also quoted Aeschylus on the death of his brother, John F Kennedy and the quote he gave was later inscribed on a memorial at the site of his own assassination! The Kennedys were their own Greek Tragedy.

Aeschylus was allegedly killed when an eagle dropped a tortoise on his head – so ultimately he was his own Greek tragedy.

The quotes I’ve chosen are these:

There is no pain so great as the memory of joy in present grief.

There are times when fear is good. It must keep its watchful place at the heart’s controls. There is advantage in the wisdom won from pain.

I’m nominating:

Floating Gold

Novus Lectio

Ray-not-Bradbury

50 thoughts on “A Greek Tragedy – Ancient Authors Challenge

  1. I love the image at the bottom and am tempted to say ‘great catch’ unless of course you were Aeschylus, he probably and quite rightly might disagree and may have even have said ‘What the shell?!”

    Great quotes 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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